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Jason A S





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PostPosted: Mon 30 Mar, 2009 5:50 am    Post subject: To Sharpen or not to sharpen?         Reply with quote

Thoughts on collectors swords. I read in a review that collectors swords should not be sharpened. As I'm new to this I assumed sharpened would be ok. How does sharpening negatively impact the item?

Thanks,
Jason
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M. Eversberg II




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PostPosted: Mon 30 Mar, 2009 6:11 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Who's it by, and what sword specifically?

M.

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Justin King
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PostPosted: Mon 30 Mar, 2009 7:21 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

It depends on a lot of factors. If the sword is not made/sold sharpened you are unlikely to increase the value by sharpening it, particularly an antique of any kind, and in the case of the latter it is likely to devalue the piece. With modern repros it is more of a personal preference thing but again if sharpening does affect the value in any way it is likely to be negative, although it probably depends more on the buyer than any market rule.
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Gabriel Lebec
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PostPosted: Mon 30 Mar, 2009 9:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Welcome to myArmoury Jason.

What is a "collector's sword?" Wink

As Justin said, it partly depends if you mean buying sharpened from the maker or sharpening after the fact. Many modern swords are sold sharp and I think it is fair to say that many people like them that way. Has little bearing on resale value. On the other hand, altering the blade afterwards is not likely to improve the blade's value, not unless it is done to professional standards.

Even in the case of antiques it depends. Nihonto (Japanese blades) have different standards of preservation than western swords, and are usually sold at a significant premium if they are in fresh polish by a professional togishi (Japanese sword polisher). These art-grade polishes can cost $100 PER INCH of blade edge, as they require a mix of conservationist, academic, artistic, and even legal qualifications.

Naturally the flip side of this is that an amateur "sharpening" or even just "cleaning" of authentic Japanese swords can irrevocably destroy the blade's value. Never ever do this.

There are many more contexts in which sharpening can be good or bad. It's impossible to say as a general statement what sharpening has to do with value; you need to specify in much more detail what situation, hypothetical or otherwise, we are discussing.

"The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of true art and true science." - Albert Einstein
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Douglas S





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PostPosted: Tue 31 Mar, 2009 8:07 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

If it's an antique, then you can only damage its value.
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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Tue 31 Mar, 2009 9:38 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The non-sharpening argument is made most often in regards to antiques and special limited edition collector swords like the Filmswords/Albion Conan series.

In fact, I'm pretty certain you're referring to Patrick Kelly's quote in his review of the Conan Atlantean sword:

Quote:
It is my opinion that buyers should purchase their Atlantean in the unsharpened state. Since this sword is viewed primarily as a collectible it should be left in mint condition. Sharpening will only decrease its long-term value.


I can see his point, I suppose. Filmswords isn't making any more of these. Sharpening them alters them from their original state and may be undesirable to anyone you'd sell it to later. Also, you might be tempted to cut with the beast, which won't do anything for its value either.

Happy

ChadA

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Jason A S





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PostPosted: Tue 31 Mar, 2009 2:26 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Hi Chad,

Your correct I did read it there. I was looking to get those film swords and some others from Albion.

Thanks everyone for your feedback and sorry I was so vague with my question.

As for limited ed repros etc it sounds like its not a good idea to sharpen. Though i'm not an investor so the resale is not so important as i'm unlikely to sell them again. I just thought that little shiny edge from the sharpening would look a little nicer than a blunt edge when viewed on the wall :-)

Am I doing a big no-no in the sword collecting world if i sharpen them? Also I thought unsharpened would ease their transition through our customs. Though sharp swords are still permissible at present..

Thanks again everyone.
Jason
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Sean O Stevens




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PostPosted: Tue 31 Mar, 2009 3:36 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well... lets put it even more simply...

Do you intend to cut anything with the sword? That is, do you wish to USE the sword... or just hang it on the wall as a collectors item?

If it's just to collect and hang on the wall, there is really NO benefit to sharpening it at all... it makes it more dangerous, could decress the value, will cost you time or money (or both) to do in the first place... and may make it more problomatic to transport.

So... if you intend to use the sword... then you have to sharpen it. If you don't... I would not.
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Patrick Kelly




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PostPosted: Tue 31 Mar, 2009 3:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

The Conan Swords are no longer in production at Albion so your only option there is to buy them on the second-hand market, that may put the issue of sharpening beyond your control as you'll be at the mercy of the former owners decision.

Any kind of collectable, a sword or anything else, is less valuable when it isn't in "mint" or original condition. In the case of the Conan Swords if they were sharpened by Albion than the issue might be in question since that's how they came from the factory at the customers request. Then again, those things are so heavy using them in sword-like fashion really isn't a reasonable expectation for most so why sharpen them?

Many if not most of you higher and mid-range swords come sharpened, as well as most custom pieces so this isn't really an issue. the lower end pieces that don't come sharpened don't have any collecting value so do what you please with them as they're hardly an investment.
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Johnathan Feccia




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PostPosted: Fri 04 May, 2012 6:28 pm    Post subject: glamdring weta         Reply with quote

i know this is a very old topic indeed. Recently i aquired a genuine Weta Glamdring sword, made by Peter Lyon. He in fact sharpened it himself, so I am sure that this would not affect the value? Especially seeing as there are only 15 plus 2 artist proofs in existence.

My main reasoning for it being sharpened though, is that extra authenticity feeling. Knowing it is a piece of art as well as a powerful weapon that could have been from that world makes it seem more real to me.

"Hither came Conan, the Cimmerian...Black Haired ...Sullen eyed...Sword in hand...a thief, a reaver, a slayer...with gigantic melancholies..and gigantic mirth, to tread the thrones of the earth, under his sandeled feet"
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R. Kolick





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PostPosted: Fri 04 May, 2012 6:56 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

this was stated earlyer but it depends on the type of sword if its an antique sword (from anywhere BUT japan) do not pollish it if it is japanise getting it pollished is esential for it to be pollished but ONLY by a profetional what ever you do do not do it yourself. i have had expiriance with many japanise swords and even though io am not an expert i have been learing from one and one of the first things i learned they are made by masters pollished by masters and are works of art you dont know half as much as you need to know to even screw one up. to modern blades like albions and A&A alway go to the maker of that sword to sarpen it cutom pieces i have no idea on wheather or not it effects the value and also you should keep in mind what you intend to do with it ie cut or just for show
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Johnathan Feccia




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PostPosted: Mon 07 May, 2012 7:00 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I would never dream of cutting with Glamdring, but as ive said. there is a beauty that can be had on a sharpened sword, that just isnt seen on an unsharpened sword in many cases. Glamdring, for instance, has a very even and smooth edge that is mirror polished itself! It is like adding another facet to a cut gem. And lets not forget about the authenticity part.

I know Peter Lyon claimed the contrary, but i believe a sword can be BOTH a weapon and a piece of art.

"Hither came Conan, the Cimmerian...Black Haired ...Sullen eyed...Sword in hand...a thief, a reaver, a slayer...with gigantic melancholies..and gigantic mirth, to tread the thrones of the earth, under his sandeled feet"
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J. Hargis




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PostPosted: Tue 08 May, 2012 3:27 pm    Post subject: Re: glamdring weta         Reply with quote

Johnathan Feccia wrote:
My main reasoning for it being sharpened though, is that extra authenticity feeling. Knowing it is a piece of art as well as a powerful weapon that could have been from that world makes it seem more real to me.

... there is a beauty that can be had on a sharpened sword, that just isnt seen on an unsharpened sword in many cases. Glamdring, for instance, has a very even and smooth edge that is mirror polished itself! It is like adding another facet to a cut gem. And lets not forget about the authenticity part.

I know Peter Lyon claimed the contrary, but i believe a sword can be BOTH a weapon and a piece of art.

I certainly agree, Johnathan. Indeed, "It is like adding another facet to a cut gem". I firmly believe there is an element of beauty inherent in a professionally sharpened blade, that nicely done edge adds the final touch.

I have this discussion frequently. IMO, professional sharpening adds authenticity and beauty.
While I do some cutting with some of my swords and daggers, I like the authenticity and feeling of potency from all of my blades being sharp, with the exception of a couple of martial arts and a few 'ritual / fantasy' pieces that I possess.

Having said that, I would also add that any sharpened blade which I do no cutting with, I have sharpened once and only once.
And I certainly agree with not sharpening a true antique. A definite no no.

An informative thread, thanks.

Jon

A poorly maintained weapon is likely to belong to an unsafe and careless fighter.
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Ryan S.





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PostPosted: Tue 08 May, 2012 10:27 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I think there is also a safety issue. so if you have a dull blade you don't have to worry as much about kids picking it up etc. If you are planning on selling it then don't sharpen it, because I think you are more likely to lose a customer that wants a dull blade, and one who wants it sharp.
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