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M. Eversberg II




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PostPosted: Mon 05 Jan, 2009 1:11 am    Post subject: Crossguard and pommel typology         Reply with quote

In the opinion of this community, what is the best presented source of information on the typologies regarding the crossguard and pommel for medieval (and earlier) swords? I know one exists, but the name of the typologies elude me at the moment. While a Google search turns up a good amount of data, is there one "grand" source on the wide internet that the members here use? I've not given the subject any thought, and while I'm memorizing the Oakeshott and Peterson typologies, I might as well include those.

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Mon 05 Jan, 2009 2:31 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Ewart Oakeshott's typology is likely the most complete and widely referenced source for medieval work. Have you seen our article that covers it in detail?


Oakeshott: The Man and his Legacy

An article by myArmoury.com

Alfred Geibig did work for Viking Age weapons:


The Sword Typology of Alfred Geibig

An article by Christopher L. Miller

R.E.M. Wheeler did work for Viking Age weapon typology too. You also mentioned Jan Petersen's Work.

A. V. Norman cataloged many things for post-medieval weaponry including hilt forms, pommels, crosses, etc, in his book The Rapier & Small-Sword: 1460-1820:


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Vincent Le Chevalier




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PostPosted: Mon 05 Jan, 2009 2:32 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Crossguard and pommel typology is actually included in Oakeshott, see http://www.myArmoury.com/feature_oakeshott3.html onwards. I doubt another popular typology exists for medieval swords...

Edit: Well Nathan beat me to the punch with a far more comprehensive post Happy

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M. Eversberg II




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PostPosted: Mon 05 Jan, 2009 7:13 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I was under the impression that someone else had done pommels and that Oakeshott was a blade oriented typology.

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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Mon 05 Jan, 2009 7:59 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

M. Eversberg II wrote:
I was under the impression that someone else had done pommels and that Oakeshott was a blade oriented typology.

M.


Please read the article for a discussion of Oakeshott's typologies. Happy

Oakeshott's blade typology is the most referred to of his typologies, but it's one part of a whole-sword classification system, including typologies for guard and pommel and a discussion of grips. The three typologies (blade, guard, pommel) are meant to work together to help classify a sword. Most people stop at the blade typology.

He also made a typology for impact weapons that's little-referred-to.

Happy

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Nathan Robinson
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PostPosted: Mon 05 Jan, 2009 10:30 am    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Our hands-on reviews also reference Oakeshott's typology for blades, pommels, and grips when appropriate.

Take for example the Albion Kingmaker sword:



Oakeshott Type XVIII blade:



Oakeshott Type K pommel:



Oakeshott Style 9 guard:



This all comes into play and defines a sword of Oakeshott Family F:


Oakeshott Family F is described as:

Oakeshott refers to swords of this family as the "epitome of the medieval sword," noting that it defines the archetype of the knightly sword's form. The popularity of this sword spans from circa 1410 through perhaps 1550. The short hilt is accompanied by a long down-sloping cross of complex cross-section with a well-defined ecussion at its center point.

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Fabrice Cognot
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PostPosted: Tue 06 Jan, 2009 5:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Chad Arnow wrote:
He also made a typology for impact weapons that's little-referred-to.


...to the point that I can't find it (please Chad, please)...

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Chad Arnow
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PostPosted: Tue 06 Jan, 2009 5:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Fabrice Cognot wrote:
Chad Arnow wrote:
He also made a typology for impact weapons that's little-referred-to.


...to the point that I can't find it (please Chad, please)...


It's in his European Weapons and Armour: From the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution.

Happy

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Fabrice Cognot
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PostPosted: Tue 06 Jan, 2009 5:14 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Heh. Thanks Chad, and silly me. The one I lost when moving house (among other things). I should have proceeded by elimination.
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