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Mike Harris




Location: Texas, USA
Joined: 18 Mar 2006
Likes: 1 page

Posts: 123

PostPosted: Fri 18 Jul, 2008 1:10 pm    Post subject: Scabbard&Belt from DBK Custom Swords         Reply with quote

This is one of those "best kept secret" things that I should just keep to myself. But I'm sharing because I don't want to be a hog. Big Grin

Brian Kunz recently started up a fledgling business from his activities with Arms of Valor and the Sword Buyer's Guide Forum. It's called DBK Custom Swords. He got started doing custom work on various pieces in the product lines sold through Arms of Valor. But recently, his purchase of an Albion Prince inspired him to branch out toward more historically plausible designs and projects. I always knew he had talent. And when you add a strong interest in the subject and an interested clientele, good things are bound to happen.

I recently contracted with him to create a scabbard and belt for my ATrim Type XII sword. What I had in mind was something like:
Quote:
"I want it to be historically plausible for a relatively poor man-at-arms in the early-to-mid 1300s. It should look like it's an older design that's been kept in service a little past it's time, but still be acceptible given the circumstances of the individual. Nothing fancy, just something that would look appropriate on a hard-bitten fighting man who would care for his gear."

The colors we settled on were a medium brown belt, attempting to come close to the distressed brown grip I'd already done on the sword. I wanted a lighter colored scabbard. I preferred it to show some use and hard circumstances, though with obvious signs that it had been well cared for.

This is what I got:




Notice the semi-frayed linen thread? It already looks years old to me. The belt will require a little usage to wear in and look as old as the scabbard, and the buckle and belt tip are noticeably new. Brian asked if I wanted this aged, but I decided not to. So, that can be part of the story can't it? A new belt on an old sword and scabbard until it gets aged looking.





Brian built the chape to match the hard-bitten nature of the "historical owner's" character. It's not fancy. The story would be something like "It's a replacement made by a local blacksmith, and it's seen lots of miles and given good service." Also notice the details of damage that would be expected through daily wear.



Hope you all enjoy a look at how this project turned out. Personally, I couldn't be happier.



Last edited by Mike Harris on Sat 19 Jul, 2008 7:16 am; edited 1 time in total
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Justin H. N˙˝ez




Location: Hyde Park, UT
Joined: 24 Aug 2007
Likes: 1 page

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 142

PostPosted: Fri 18 Jul, 2008 2:01 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Looks terrific!

How about picture with it strapped on How does it hang?

"Nothing in fencing is really difficult, it just takes work." - Aldo Nadi
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Grayson C.




Location: NCF, Sarasota, FL
Joined: 25 Oct 2006

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 223

PostPosted: Sun 20 Jul, 2008 4:10 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Brian Kunz really does some phenominal work...


I remember when he started doing basic hilt wraps and scabbard decoration and I thought "My god, he's got so much potential with what he's doing!" Just recently he's started doing complete woodcore scabbards and the results are just amazing. I highly suggest that you all take advantage of this unknown gem, you'll be pleasantly suprised! And since he's new his waiting times should be pretty darn generous plus his prices are suprsingly reasonable for the quality of the work.
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Brian K.
Industry Professional



Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Joined: 01 Jan 2008

Posts: 717

PostPosted: Wed 23 Jul, 2008 1:38 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Thanks Mike. It was a fun project. It was definitely one that once finished I wished I had my own version of it.
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Steven Janus




Location: Florida, USA
Joined: 12 Mar 2008

Posts: 185

PostPosted: Wed 23 Jul, 2008 2:54 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I already have! I have had him do two projects already with more comming!
Newbie Sword collector
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Matthew G.M. Korenkiewicz




Location: Michigan, USA
Joined: 08 Mar 2004
Reading list: 3 books

Posts: 853

PostPosted: Wed 23 Jul, 2008 3:05 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Nicely accomplished. And nicely promoted. I've been hemming and hawwing about
getting a scabbard made by a fellow-forumite and fellow-michigander, Dan Dickinson,
but haven't yet come to commit the funds.

Before Dan, I had a couple scabbards made by Greg Griggs that turned out very nicely,
and before him I used to contract Christian Fletcher, who has gone on to much bigger
and better things ....

I have run into one reoccurring problem, however ( not yet with Dan's work, I should say )
and that is the scabbard interior staining the edges and sometimes the flat of the blade.
And I wonder if anyone would care to comment, offer a solution, or pose a reason ...

First off, I admit to using a light coat of wax to treat my swords. So I've wondered if the wax
and the glue used in the scabbard somehow can not chemically coexist, so produce this
staining effect. I flitz-clean the blade, then lighty wax it.

Secondly, I've wondered if it could be the nature of the wood and glue used. After a relatively
short period -- two weeks or so -- the Christian Fletcher scabbards cease staining the blade.
However, Greg's scabbards -- and this is not a knock at Greg because other's have had work
done by him without a hitch -- to this day, will not stop. Greg even made an extra effort when he
wool-lined a second scabbard, but that did not solve my dilemma.

Thirdly, can it be Michigan's atmosphere combined with my basement rooms' atmosphere ?
Summer, winter, spring, or fall ... Michigan can be damp and humid, and a basement isn't
gonna help.

With the guilty scabbards I've tried " drying them out " by hanging them in the furnace room
when the heat is being used. Or just hanging them out in the open for periods of time without
the sword sheathed, but so far neither tactic worked.

Any thoughts gentlefolk ???
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Brian K.
Industry Professional



Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
Joined: 01 Jan 2008

Posts: 717

PostPosted: Wed 23 Jul, 2008 4:21 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Matthew G.M. Korenkiewicz wrote:
Nicely accomplished. And nicely promoted. I've been hemming and hawwing about
getting a scabbard made by a fellow-forumite and fellow-michigander, Dan Dickinson,
but haven't yet come to commit the funds.

Before Dan, I had a couple scabbards made by Greg Griggs that turned out very nicely,
and before him I used to contract Christian Fletcher, who has gone on to much bigger
and better things ....

I have run into one reoccurring problem, however ( not yet with Dan's work, I should say )
and that is the scabbard interior staining the edges and sometimes the flat of the blade.
And I wonder if anyone would care to comment, offer a solution, or pose a reason ...

First off, I admit to using a light coat of wax to treat my swords. So I've wondered if the wax
and the glue used in the scabbard somehow can not chemically coexist, so produce this
staining effect. I flitz-clean the blade, then lighty wax it.

Secondly, I've wondered if it could be the nature of the wood and glue used. After a relatively
short period -- two weeks or so -- the Christian Fletcher scabbards cease staining the blade.
However, Greg's scabbards -- and this is not a knock at Greg because other's have had work
done by him without a hitch -- to this day, will not stop. Greg even made an extra effort when he
wool-lined a second scabbard, but that did not solve my dilemma.

Thirdly, can it be Michigan's atmosphere combined with my basement rooms' atmosphere ?
Summer, winter, spring, or fall ... Michigan can be damp and humid, and a basement isn't
gonna help.

With the guilty scabbards I've tried " drying them out " by hanging them in the furnace room
when the heat is being used. Or just hanging them out in the open for periods of time without
the sword sheathed, but so far neither tactic worked.

Any thoughts gentlefolk ???


"First off, I admit to using a light coat of wax to treat my swords. So I've wondered if the wax
and the glue used in the scabbard somehow can not chemically coexist, so produce this
staining effect. I flitz-clean the blade, then lighty wax it."

I suppose if something were applied on the inside of the scabbard to begin with, such as a stain or another substance, the humidity and/or wax may cause it to liquify a bit. Or as you say a chemical reaction may be occuring. This could be enough to smear onto the blade and stain it.

I leave the wood on the inside of my scabbards natural, with no foreign substances. On the outside I use a clear lacquer to keep the wood from getting wet and warping. I haven't had any complaints about this, yet. But I wouldn't expect to, either, given my procedures.

Now it is possible that the dye used on the leather rain guard could get wet and 'bleed' onto the sword or down into the scabbard wood core. However, in my case, I use sealing creams to lock the color(s) in. It could still 'bleed' if it got extremely wet, however. But if a scabbard gets that wet, you have more problems then just 'bleeding' colors Surprised

"Secondly, I've wondered if it could be the nature of the wood and glue used."

Definitely. A wood should be left natural on the inside, and a wood glue only for adhesive. I light color wood should also be used, because some darker woods can 'bleed' a little color if wet. If stains and or colors were used on the scabbard wood interior, this would definitely cause an issue. Possibly even if a lacquer were used on the inside could cause this issue.

"Thirdly, can it be Michigan's atmosphere combined with my basement rooms' atmosphere ?
Summer, winter, spring, or fall ... Michigan can be damp and humid, and a basement isn't
gonna help."

I would say humidity is your main culprit, if I had to guess.

"With the guilty scabbards I've tried " drying them out " by hanging them in the furnace room
when the heat is being used. Or just hanging them out in the open for periods of time without
the sword sheathed, but so far neither tactic worked. "

Something on the inside of the scabbard is transferring onto your blade, and there wouldn't be a fix as long as you're dealing with humidity. Even the wax could cause it to get just soft enough to transfer onto your blade. Obviously there is no way to work on the inside of your scabbard without ruining it. So I can't think of any easy solutions, unfortunately.

Brian Kunz
www.dbkcustomswords.com
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Leo Todeschini
Industry Professional



Location: Oxford, UK
Joined: 12 Nov 2006

Spotlight topics: 1
Posts: 1,524

PostPosted: Thu 24 Jul, 2008 3:13 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

I made a scabbard years back and used a PVA wood glue, and I found that it (something) caused staining and rust on the blade. I have not looked up the glue chemically, but it has quite an acidic smell to it and wondered if it was in fact acidic.

I have never used PVA since and have never had a problem.

Could be that?

Tod

www.todsworkshop.com
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