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Shawn Mulock




Location: Calgary Alberta, Canada
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PostPosted: Sun 29 Feb, 2004 10:08 pm    Post subject: Methods for taking measurements         Reply with quote

I was hoping somebody could help me here. I am planning on taking measurements of an executioner's sword I may have access to. Since executioner's swords have come up here before, I was hoping somebody would be able to assist me with information about precautions and methods for measuring and examining an antique sword in order to eliminate any possible harm I could do.

Also, would anybody be interested in these stats for making a reproduction? Big Grin

"It is not what you have, but what you have done".
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Craig Johnson
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Location: Minneapolis, MN, USA
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PostPosted: Mon 01 Mar, 2004 5:38 am    Post subject: Hello Shawn         Reply with quote

Here are some guidlines for inspecting antique swords.

http://www.oakeshott.org/hsdp.html

Best
Craig
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Shawn Mulock




Location: Calgary Alberta, Canada
Joined: 10 Sep 2003
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 100

PostPosted: Mon 01 Mar, 2004 1:36 pm    Post subject: Re: Hello Shawn         Reply with quote

Craig Johnson wrote:
Here are some guidlines for inspecting antique swords.

http://www.oakeshott.org/hsdp.html

Best
Craig


Great! Thanks Craig! Big Grin

Are there any suggestions about protecting the weapon being measured during the measurements? I don't want to damage an antique while recording it.

"It is not what you have, but what you have done".
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Björn Hellqvist
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PostPosted: Mon 01 Mar, 2004 2:51 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Well, bring white cotton gloves (you can find them at the pharmacy) for handling the antiques. Usually, museums and collections have plenty of those around, but it makes a good impression to arrive prepared. If you use calipers and other metal measuring instruments, use them with care. Do not drag them along the object being measured, but open them, change measuring spot, and close for measurement. If the original wrap is in place, be very careful - the leather might be brittle, or a wire wrap loose and frayed, catching on those white cotton gloves.
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Craig Johnson
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PostPosted: Mon 01 Mar, 2004 3:30 pm    Post subject: Tools         Reply with quote

Björn is right take care when using metal tools. I have plastic ones and they work well for this. I would also recommend having a pen light, magnifying glass, tape measure (again watch if metal), and a caliper.

Craig
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Björn Hellqvist
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PostPosted: Mon 01 Mar, 2004 3:40 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Bring a set of scales - digital if possible. There are affordable digital scales for kitchen use. Avoid fishing scales, at least the cheap ones.
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Shawn Mulock




Location: Calgary Alberta, Canada
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Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 100

PostPosted: Tue 02 Mar, 2004 11:47 pm    Post subject:         Reply with quote

Björn Hellqvist wrote:
Well, bring white cotton gloves (you can find them at the pharmacy) for handling the antiques. Usually, museums and collections have plenty of those around, but it makes a good impression to arrive prepared. If you use calipers and other metal measuring instruments, use them with care. Do not drag them along the object being measured, but open them, change measuring spot, and close for measurement. If the original wrap is in place, be very careful - the leather might be brittle, or a wire wrap loose and frayed, catching on those white cotton gloves.


Thanks much Björn! I became aware of the cotton glove snagging on loose furniture bits just yesterday when examining a later Schiavona at the Glenbow Museum! Lucky for me, I was going slow and was able to stop before I tore off the leather wrap. They have two incredible examples of executioner's swords there and I would like to have at least one of them recorded and maybe even reproduced eventually.

"It is not what you have, but what you have done".
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Shawn Mulock




Location: Calgary Alberta, Canada
Joined: 10 Sep 2003
Reading list: 8 books

Posts: 100

PostPosted: Tue 02 Mar, 2004 11:54 pm    Post subject: Re: Tools         Reply with quote

Craig Johnson wrote:
Björn is right take care when using metal tools. I have plastic ones and they work well for this. I would also recommend having a pen light, magnifying glass, tape measure (again watch if metal), and a caliper.

Craig


I will take it to heart to find some good plastic or rubberized tools to use. The penlight, I kind of have overkill there...http://www.surefire.com/maxexp/main/co_disp/d.../sesent/00. I will see about grabbing a magnifying glass with a plastic rim and handle. Would a tailor's tape do for avoiding metal measuring tapes?

Also, Björn, Thank you for mentioning that a good scale will be useful. I would never have thought of it, even though every review here mentions weight... Wink

"It is not what you have, but what you have done".
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Craig Johnson
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PostPosted: Wed 03 Mar, 2004 6:05 am    Post subject: Hello Shawn         Reply with quote

The tailors tapes do work well for some situations. I usually carry one. They can be a bit stretchy some times so you want to make sure you use firm but not excessive pressure. Also for large measurments lay the tap flat on the table beside the piece as apposed to on top of the item or holding both. For the recording session its best to leave the item flat on the table except when absolutely needed to measure something. Pick it up to admire, but try not to admire and measure at the same time. Also in any major museum. When handling the item do it over the work table, when at all possible. Do not move around the floor or carry it about to much. This will keep the conservators from getting to antsy, and getting paranoid about you seeing other items.

Best
Craig
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